Economic Development

Buy Local

Marshfield Buy Local

Mission Statement

Enhance the economic and social vitality of our local community by involving local residents and businesses in a sustainable fashion; as evidenced by increasing resident and business spending within the local area.

What is Buy Local?

The idea is simple, really. BUY LOCAL. Spend your money here. Support local businesses, and they will continue to grow. Create a positive local economy, and more businesses will come. When more businesses come, we have more options. Buying local has immediate positive influence. Immediate results. Money in the economy. Tax revenue for municipal services. Good jobs. But it doesn’t end there. Buying local has a huge impact on the future growth and success of Marshfield. And we can all help.

What makes you go back to a community you’ve visited before? Is it the hotel you stayed at? The restaurant you ate at? Shopping in a quaint downtown? A park or museum you visited? It’s probably not one of these things at all, but a combination of them. Each of these things makes up a piece of a community’s identity, and character. A positive feeling when you leave Marshfield makes you want to come back. If we can create a unique identity, leaving visitors with a positive experience, we will become a “destination” for tourism.

A strong local economy is also a draw for future potential businesses. Seeing a community with great support for local businesses shows our investment in the local economy. As more businesses come to Marshfield, our local economy improves even more, and the options for shopping and eating in Marshfield grow.

An even more abstract benefit of supporting local businesses is that of population growth. A strong local economy, with booming shopping and entertaining are one of many aspects that draw residents to our community. Buying local directly affects the quality of life in the Marshfield area, and makes it a great place to move to!

Why Buy Local?

  1. Buy Local — Support yourself: Several studies have shown that when you buy from an independent, locally owned business, rather than a nationally owned business, significantly more of your money is used to make purchases from other local businesses, service providers and farms — continuing to strengthen the economic base of the community. Area businesses are strong supporters of the Keep the Buck$ Here campaign, which offers savings opportunities for consumers.
  2. Community Well-Being: Locally owned businesses build strong neighborhoods by sustaining communities, linking neighbors, and by contributing more to local causes and investing in the community. Local business owners often serve on the boards of nonprofit organizations, merchants associations, and community functions.
  3. Keep our community unique: Where we shop, where we eat and where we have fun — all of it makes our community home. Our one-of-a-kind businesses are an integral part of the distinctive character of this place. Our tourism businesses also benefit. “When people go on vacation they generally seek out destinations that offer them the sense of being someplace, not just anyplace.” ~ Richard Moe, President, National Historic Preservation Trust
  4. Reduce environmental impact: Locally owned businesses can make more local purchases requiring less transportation, and generally set up shop in town or city centers as opposed to developing on the fringe. This generally means contributing less to sprawl, congestion, habitat loss and pollution.
  5. Create more good jobs: Small local businesses are the largest employer nationally and in our community, provide the most jobs to residents.
  6. Get better customer service: Local businesses often hire people with a better understanding of the products they are selling and take more time to get to know customers. Local businesses have the ability to custom order items for customers when needed.
  7. Invest in community: Local businesses are owned by people who live in this community, are less likely to leave, and are more invested in the community’s future.
  8. Put your taxes to good use: Local businesses in town centers require comparatively little infrastructure investment and make more efficient use of public services as compared to nationally owned stores entering the community.
  9. Product Diversity – Buy what you want, not what someone wants you to buy: A marketplace of tens of thousands of small businesses is the best way to ensure innovation and low prices over the long-term. A multitude of small businesses, each selecting products based not on a national sales plan but on their own interests and the needs of their local customers, guarantees a much broader range of product choices.
  10. Encourage local prosperity: A growing body of economic research shows that in an increasingly homogenized world, entrepreneurs and skilled workers are more likely to invest and settle in communities that preserve their one-of-a-kind businesses and distinctive character.